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When I first read about The Wheel of Time way back 1996, there were only six books and my friend Albert Hernandez introduced me to this novel.  I was not fond of long and lengthly books with very few pictures.  In fact the photos can only be seen at the cover and the map from inside.  What awed me however in reading The Wheel of Time is its ability to create vivid imaginations of the world from which the novel's story operates.

Robert Jordan in his life had created a world so vivid, so authentic and so rich that for me it enriches that which Tolkien started.  The Wheel of Time books became lengthy because of how Jordan describe the characters and the setting of the events.  He would describe the clothing of each character, their expression so intently that a picture in your mind will surely be formed.  In describing the settings, Jordan would go so intricate and it would fill your imagination therefore constructing a picture in your mind.

When Rober Jordan died on September 6, 2007, fans of the novel was saddened because he left the book hanging.  There were even speculation that it would be an unfinished novel.  I know that I am late to write this but yesterday, I was so surprised and so excited to see that the novel lives on and finally it would have a final book bu January 2013.

While browsing "The Wheel of Time" collection at National Bookstore, I saw The Wheel of Time Book 12: The Gathering Storm.  The book was written by Brandon Sanderson, a handpicked writer to continue the novel by Robert Jordan's wife Harriet McDougal.  He was chosen because of the quality of his work and because Sanderson he himself was a fan of the novel.

The final chapter of The Wheel of Time was supposed to be "A Memory of Light" which would reach around 2,000 pages.  However, because the book might be too long, Tor Books, the publisher of The Wheel of Time decided to split it into three volumes.
  • The Wheel of Time Book 12: The Gathering Storm - October 27, 2009
  • The Wheel of Time Book 13: Towers of Midnight - November 2, 2010
  • The Wheel of Time Book 14: A Memory of Light - January 8, 2013.
Robert Jordan was indeed a great author for while he was diagnosed with a terminal heart disease in December 2005 he was so dedicated to finish the book.   "I'm getting out notes, so if the worst actually happens, someone could finish A Memory of Light and have it end the way I want it to end," he said during an article entitled "My Author, My Life."

What is The Wheel of Time?

In summary it is an epic fantasy novel which runs a total of 14 books starting from The Eye of the World released in 1984 to A Memory of Light to be released on January 8, 2013.  Notable about the novel is its length, its detailed imaginary world, a well-developed magic system and vast cast of characters.


The Wheel of Time draws elements from European and Asian Mythology including those found in Hinduism and Buddhism.  It also included the concept of balance, duality. respect for nature and creation story parallel to that of Christianity.  The Wheel of Time was in part also inspired by Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace.

The Magic in the Wheel of Time is drawn from what is called the One Power which has a male and female section.  The male part is called saidin and the female side is called saidar.  Saidin was tained by the Dark One thus those who channel it tends to be mad.  

There is an organization known as Aes Sedai.  These are females who could channel and who also hunts males who can channel saidin in order to prevent a catastrophic prophecy and event that could end the world. 

The story revolved around three main characters, Rand al-Thor, Perrin Aybarra and Mat Cauthon.  Rand is the Dragon Reborn which is prophesied to face the Dark One in the final battle known as Tarmon Gai'don.

Events and portents that are believed to lead to the Last Battle take place in Knife of Dreams and The Gathering Storm. The Last Battle will take place in A Memory of Light.



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